Category Archives: Tunnel

Flying Under the Hammersmith Flyover

King Street Looking West (Artists Impression by www.westlondonlink.com)

King Street Looking West (Artists Impression by West London Link)

Hammersmith Flyover in West London is one of the first examples of an elevated road using reinforced concrete. Designed by G Maunsell & Partners & built in 1960, it has carried the A4 into Central London through Hammersmith as well as dividing local opinion and acting as a physical barrier ever since.

However, there are plans to turn the 6 lane flyover into a ‘flyunder’, comprising a range of tunnel options from shallow cut and cover to deep bore. It potentially makes a 2.5 mile strip of land ripe for development and already carries the endorsement of the Mayor of London, describing the scheme as “brilliant”.

The first official artist’s impressions of how Hammersmith town centre could look if a ‘flyunder’ burrows beneath it have been released showing land formerly blighted by the trunk road replaced by new homes, offices and green space. A report, drawn up by West London Link – a consortium of local designers in association with Channel Tunnel engineers Halcrow — was commissioned by Hammersmith & Fulham Council amid growing concern about the lifespan of the current route, which is used by 90,000 vehicles a day.

Transport for London is ultimately responsible as the A4 is a strategic route in the capital. It is spending £60 million fixing the 620-metre concrete structure after corrosion was identified and claim the work will keep the flyover in use for decades. The shortest “flyunder” option would run under the current route of the flyover and would cost £218 million. The longest 2.5-mile route would run from west of the Hogarth roundabout to Earl’s Court Road and would be the longest road tunnel in London. The third possibility is a 2.2-mile tunnel ending in West Kensington. Both longer, deep bore versions would also require a junction halfway along, near Hammersmith Broadway, to allow local traffic to use the tunnel.

Around £1billion worth of former highway land could be freed up to help pay for the flyunder works, according to a feasibility study.

Cllr Nicholas Botterill, Hammersmith & Fulham Council Leader, said: “A flyunder would enable Hammersmith Berlin Wall to be torn down and reconnect our divided town centre with the river and make our once beautiful town centre an even more attractive place to live in, visit or do business.”

Jim Davis
Editorial

10 selected for Colombian road projects

autopista-al-mar1

On February 6, Colombia’s National Infrastructure Agency (ANI) announced the 10 prequalified for the road project that will connect with Highway concession Medellín Sea 2 starting in the town of San Cristobal in the tunnel of the West, to Santa Fe de Antioquia, and connecting Santafe Bolombolo of Antioquia.

The project will have an investment of 1.50 billion pesos, 19 tunnels and 41 bridges will be built and will involve a total of 176 kilometers distributed in the following functional units:

  • Construction of second carriageway tunnel between West and San Jeronimo.
  • Construction of second carriageway between San Jeronimo and Santa Fe de Antioquia (including the stretch between Santa Fe de Antioquia and Cañasgordas).
  • Duplication in the tunnel of the West.
  • Improvement to the road between Santa Fe de Antioquia and Bolombolo.

It is estimated that the project will create 4,200 jobs in the construction phase.

 

The following is a list of prequalified companies for this project:

1 WEST GRANT PLURAL STRUCTURE PSF

ODINSA GROUP SA 30% Colombia

Mincivil SA 25% Colombia

EL CONDOR CONSTRUCTION SA 20% Colombia

TERMOTECNICA Coindustrial SA 7.50% Colombia

SAS ICEIN 7.50% Colombia

MOTA ENGIL Engineering & Construction COLOMBIA SA BRANCH 10%    Portugal Suc. Colombia

2 VINCC Urabá 1

VINCI CONCESSIONS SAS 50% France

CONCONCRETO CONSTRUCTION SA 50% Colombia

3 SAC 4G

CONCESSIONS SACYR COLOMBIA SAS 55% Colombia

SACYR COLOMBIA SAS 45% Colombia

4 CONCESIONARIA EUROLAT ANTIOQUEÑA

INFRASTRUCTURE CONCESSION SAS 50% Colombia

ACCIONA Concessions CHILE LTDA 50% Chile

5 PLURAL STRUCTURE Shikun & Binui – Grodco

Shikun & Binui VT AG 50% Switzerland

CI Grodco S. CIVIL ENGINEERS IN CA 50% Colombia

6 PLURAL STRUCTURE IRIDIUM – GRAÑA Y MONTERO

GRAÑA Y MONTERO SAA 50% Peru

IRIDIUM COLOMBIA SAS INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 50%    Colombia

7 CONSTRUCTION AND INVESTMENT BETA SAS E IL & FS TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS LIMITED

CONSTRUCTION AND INVESTMENT BETA SAS 26% Colombia

IL & FS TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS LIMITED 74% India

8 PLURAL STRUCTURE Cintra CONCESIA

Cintra COLOMBIA SAS INFRASTRUCTURE 66% Colombia

SAS CONCESIA 24% Colombia

MC SAS EARLY VICTORIES10% Colombia

9 PLURAL STRUCTURE OHL OHL CONCESSIONS AND CONCESSIONS SAS COLOMBIA CHILE SA    

OHL Concessions COLOMBIA SAS 60% Colombia

OHL Concessions CHILE SA 40% Chile

10 SEA HIGHWAY 1

STUDIES AND PROJECTS OF THE SUN SAS EPISOL 60% Colombia

COLOMBIAN TENDERS AND CONCESSIONS SAS 40% Colombia

Leipzig’s Gain after the Pain

© Andreas Schmidt

© Andreas Schmidt

After more than ten years since ground breaking, the Leipzig City Tunnel officially opened to rail traffic on 15 December, providing a vital link for S-Bahn trains between the north and south of the city via the central Hauptbahnhof Station. The project was complex; two tunnel bores, each measuring 1.4 km in length had to be built in difficult subsoil conditions at a depth of up to 16m beneath the city centre. Four underground and two above ground stations were also constructed.

The location of the construction site not only made it difficult to master the site installations and material deliveries for the completion of the stations; the necessary transport and assembly technologies and procedures also had to be individually developed and selected for each station – the reason being lack of space. All lower escalator sections had to be delivered before the start of construction on the stations, as there would not have been enough space once the facades were complete. In addition to all the spatial challenges, it was also necessary to work without interruptions to rail traffic, especially in and around Hauptbahnhof Station.

Such a connection in Leipzig has been under consideration for over a century with passengers until now having to circumvent the city to travel north-south in a very time consuming process. The construction of the City Tunnel has been very time and money consuming going beyond programme and budget by a considerable margin. However, with travel time on some routes being reduced by up to 40 minutes and new stations, each designed by different architects wanting to leave a strong aesthetic and functional mark on such an important scheme, the phrase ‘no pain, no gain’ is especially applicable to the immense challenges and rewards faced in this project.

Jim Davis
Editorial

 

Written By admin 
December 23, 2013 16:47 pm
Posted In Rail, Tunnel